A QUICK LOOK AT THE BEAUTY OF SOME VERY ORDINARY PLANTS

Today I decided to take a break from blogging by blogging in a more relaxed way than usual. I prepared some old portraits of plants, not many of them, and I don't have much to say about those plants. Have a good viewing.

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This is the Avena fatua, commonly known as the common wild oat., a type of grass very common here where I live ... and throughout all temperate regions of the world. Is native to Euroasia but was introduced in many other places.
The photograph was taken during the golden hour near the end of a long summer day. The year was 2008.
The seeds had already fallen so the structure that was holding them was translucent in the beautiful evening light.

This is the Trifolium angustifolium, commonly known as the narrow-leaf crimson clover, another plant that can be found throughout the temperate regions of the world. Its native range comprises Europe, Asia, and North Africa.
Here you can see a fragment of the hairy flowerhead that holds a bunch of small flowers.

Here you can see the flowerbuds of the Calystegia silvatica plant. Calystegia silvatica, commonly known as the large bindweed is a beautiful climbing plant that produces many flowers. Is native to southern Europe but has been introduced to many other areas because it is an attractive garden plant.
You can see only the tops of the flowerbuds in this photograph, to be honest, not the entire thing.
I wanted the buds to look like some kind of sculpture not a realistic depiction of the plant's anatomy.

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This is Avena fatua again. The plant is shown in a different composition and in a different light in this shot.

These are the fresh young leaves of the Cistus monspeliensis plant. Cistus monspeliensis, commonly known as the narrow-leaved cistus is an evergreen shrub that grows in southern Europe and northern parts of Africa.
The plant produces tons of beautiful flowers but here you can see only a small detail of its foliage.

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This is another grass. The Briza maxima. Today, while preparing this post, I found out that it has plenty of common names in the English language. I'll write some of them now; big quaking grass, great quaking grass, greater quaking grass, large quaking grass, blowfly grass, rattlesnake grass, shelly grass, rattle grass, and shell grass.
Briza maxima is native to Northern Africa, Western Asia, and Southern Europe and is cultivated or naturalized in many other parts of the world.
In this photograph, you can see the interesting, shell-like structures that hold the seeds. These things always reminded me of trilobites.
I remember playing with them as they were figurines representing trilobites when I was a child.

AND THAT'S IT. AS ALWAYS HERE ON HIVE, THE PHOTOGRAPHS ARE MY WORK - THE END.

The following links will take you to the sites with more information about some of the protagonists of this post. I found some stuff about them there.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avena_fatua
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trifolium_angustifolium
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calystegia_silvatica
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cistus_monspeliensis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Briza_maxima

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