Fungi Friday : The cuteness of the Panus

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The first thing that really catches the eye is their thick hair on their caps. It looks so smooth and soft. Surely they are among a number of hairy mushrooms. They grew on some dead wood branches lying on the grass. It is a saprobic mushroom that grows solitary or clustered, between May to December. Being in the family Polyporaceae, it is Panus neostrigosus. Previously, it was known as Lentinus strigosus, and had the common name, Ruddy panus.

Another thing that immediately attracts you to these mushrooms is their concave, vase-like fruiting bodies with a width of up to 2-3 cm (for these mushrooms I found; it is said they can be up to 7 cm wide). On its coiled margins are dense fine hairs. The stem emerges from the dead wood with decurrent gills, runs on the stem, white.

These Panus neostrigosus mushrooms I found in Aceh, Sumatra. There is no characteristic smell and taste, and it is actually inedible. But a source said it was shown to have hypoglycemic abilities that were tested on diabetic rats.

For me, they have enough attractive and cute appearance for me to take many pictures of them.

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Sources:
1. Panus neostrigosus.
2. Panus neostrigosus
3. Hypoglycemic effect of Lentinus strigosus

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