Mushroom Monday - AGROCYBE PEDIADES ... AND SOME OTHER MUSHROOMS FROM THE BAY

Today I didn't go far in search of mushrooms. Only about six hundred meters, to the bay near the port of my hometown. Again.

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I already posted about that place a couple of times in October, so some of the species you already saw in those older posts will appear here as well. But not now. For the start, I have some new little mushrooms, that I didn't encounter on my previous walks along the bay.

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These are the Agrocybe pediades ...

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... and some of them were partially covered, and kind of decorated, with some green mold.

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Trichoderma is a genus of fungi in the family Hypocreaceae that is present in most types of soil. Most species are in symbiotic relationships with various plants, but some grow on other fungi, where they damage or destroy their hosts. They are visible as a green mold that can be a big problem in mushroom cultivations.

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I don't know which Trichoderma exactly is portrayed in these photographs, but the green mold definitively enriched today's experience. It added another layer to the story.

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Here you can see the gills of an Agrocybe pediades mushroom.

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I found the mushrooms in a very humid place, in the shade of pine trees. While the morning dew evaporated hours ago on the meadows, here was still present on the ground. On the flat green leaves, on twigs and needles ...

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... and on small, delicate, mostly horizontal spider webs ...

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... where the droplets looked like pure magic ...

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... especially when seen through a macro lens.

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Agrocybe pediades are edible. But not very good, I heard. Never tried them because I don't feel comfortable with many similar small mushrooms around. For my taste, this species is too risky and confusing. I am confident enough that these are the right mushrooms in writing a post, but when it comes to eating them - the confidence evaporates quickly.

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Agrocybe pediades on this photograph grew under the thorny leaf of some young thistle plant. Not all mushrooms in this area had problems with the Trichoderma mold.

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Besides the small cluster from the post's opening ...

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... only this one had the green thing on the top of its cap.

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Here I mounted the macro lens again ...

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... and took a few more moldy shots ...

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... before leaving that humid place and continuing my Mushroom Monday hunt.

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After an hour of rambling around with nothing fungi-related to photograph, I came across this pretty big cluster ...

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... of Coprinellus micaceus mushrooms.

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About twenty meters further I found a small group with the caps still closed like umbrellas on a sunny day.

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I found this colorful Russula ...

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... the Russula vesca, half an hour later.

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These two mushrooms of the same species were photographed nearby.

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The color of the cap in these mushrooms can vary. A lot.

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And now ...

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... with the last few Russula shots ...

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... it's time to end the post.

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I haven't found much today, but still, more than I expected. As always in these posts on HIVE, the photographs are my work.

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