St Anthony of Padua Church

Inside St Anthony of Padua Church

Hi again everyone, I have bene slack with posting and even worse with commenting on posts, but I have started a new routine for myself which hopefully will make me able to be on here a little more frequently.
I still haven't got out of my habit of waking around 4:30AM each day which I did for decades when working, but I haven't been making the most of the early start I will admit, but for the last few days, I get up, play on the switch or xbox for an hour or so, and then pop upstairs one a bit more awake and have been getting back into editing photos, photos taken last year as I still havent got out for photo walks yet, still busy with other things or on the days were not busy it seems to rain, but am hoping our luck will change soon.

Anyway thats enough of a waffling intro now onto this post, which is a few shots taking inside St Anthony of Padua Church here in New Bedford MA, Taken after we had helped out at a food pantry they host last year, we haven't done it for a while, but when Lulu is fully recovered we may well start helping out there again.


St Anthony of Padua.jpg

Sony A7iii 17mm F8 1/5 Sec ISO 8000
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A little bit about the parish and church from source
St. Anthony of Padua was founded in 1895 to serve the needs of French Canadian Catholics who lived in the North End of New Bedford. The new parish was under the care of first pastor, Fr. Hormisdas Deslauriers (1861–1916), an energetic leader who would have great influence on the parishes future development. The first mass was celebrated on Oct 6th 1895 at ‘’North Union Hall’’ on Bullard Street. Shortly thereafter a two-story wood-frame church was dedicated on March 8, 1896.

The present Romanesque style church was begun in 1902 when the parish acquired plans from Canadian architect Joseph Venne of Montreal. The cornerstone for the new building was laid in June 1904 and work began on shortly thereafter. On September 20, 1904 several construction workers were seriously injured and one killed when a 50-foot wall collapsed at the construction site.

After the accident the original contractor, Michael J. Houlihan of Providence, Rhode Island, withdrew from the project and noted Fall River architect Louis G. Destremps was brought in as supervising architect. The church exterior was completed in December 1905 and the lower church was available for masses by 1908. The upper portion of the church, though not yet ready for religious service was opened for public viewing on January 17, 1909. The period of 1909-1912 was largely taken up by extensive interior decoration and the installation of a large Casavant pipe organ. The finished church was formally dedicated on November 28, 1912.

The exterior is of red sandstone from East Longmeadow, Massachusetts. The spire is 256 feet high, the third tallest in New England. The Cathedral of Saint Joseph of Hartford, Connecticut is the tallest in New England. The Memorial Church of Harvard University in Cambridge is the tallest church in Massachusetts. The building is 241 feet long and 80 feet wide (135 feet wide at the transept). It seats 2,000 worshipers and several thousand more standing. The outline of the church can be seen for miles around and dominates the skyline of North New Bedford.


St Anthony of Padua-3.jpg

Sony A7iii 22mm F8 1/40 Sec ISO 12800
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These photos came out better than i Expected to be honest as it was a grey day and there was no lights on in the church, its a pretty grand building I must say


St Anthony of Padua-2.jpg

Sony A7iii 17mm F8 1/10 Sec ISO 12800
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And that’s all folks


unless stated otherwise all photos used in my posts are taken and owned by myself, if you wish to use any of my images please contact me.



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